Educational Articles

Care & Wellness

  • Weight loss is tough for anyone – two- or four-legged! However, losing weight and getting in shape can add not only years to your dog’s life, it can also make those extra years more enjoyable.

  • Dogs, like people, can develop a variety of bladder and kidney stones. Bladder stones (uroliths or cystic calculi), are rock-like formations of minerals that form in the urinary bladder, and are more common than kidney stones in dogs. A somewhat rare form of urolith in the dog is composed of cystine crystals.

  • An overview of the rules regulating cat food labeling, in order to better understand and interpret the information they contain.

  • Evaluating dog food labels is a challenging task for pet owners. Read about the rules governing dog food labeling in order to better interpret the information they contain.

  • If you think your veterinary health care providers are speaking a foreign language, you are not alone. If you don’t quite grasp everything you hear or read, don’t feel like you’re illiterate. Deciphering “medicalese” can be tough!

  • What is declawing? Why is it controversial? What are the alternatives? Let's discuss the controversial subject of declawing with the overall wellbeing of our feline friends as a top priority.

  • A joint connects two or more bones together. Most joints in the body are mobile, allowing the bones to move in relationship to each other. The vast majority of moveable joints are held together by an outer layer of tough fibrous tissue called the "joint capsule".

  • When rough tartar accumulates on tooth surfaces and touches the gum line it’s time for a professional oral assessment, treatment, and prevention visit. This visit will include a thorough dental examination, teeth cleaning, and polishing to remove the tartar and invisible plaque from all of the tooth surfaces.

  • Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians. Approximately two-thirds of cats over three years of age have some degree of dental disease. The most common problems are due to periodontal disease, gingivitis and cervical neck lesions, also called oral resorptive lesions.

  • Diarrhea means the production of feces that are softer than normal. Normal equine feces are produced in formed, non-offensive smelling, greenish-brown, semi-solid portions that will break up in the hand, revealing varying degrees of fibrous content depending upon diet.